opiates

Medical marijuana is a viable alternative to opioids

"Do no harm" is more than just a motto:

A bipartisan effort to legalize marijuana for medical use in North Carolina got a legislative committee hearing on Wednesday. But it's unclear whether enough legislators are ready now to alter their views on pot to make it law.

With nearly three-quarters of states already allowing medical marijuana, senators who unveiled their framework told colleagues the measure takes health and safety seriously while offering palliative care for those with painful or life-threatening illnesses such as cancer.

If you listen to NPR on a regular basis, you may have heard a segment recently about medical marijuana, where they talked about doctors not being exposed to education about the palliative properties of cannabis, even those physicians who were supportive of it. There is a misconception that research in this area is thin and/or not conclusive, but in fact the NIH has compiled the results from several studies:

NC county government sues Big Pharma over opioid crisis

New Hanover County takes their battle against addiction to court:

Drug makers “aggressively pushed highly addictive, dangerous opioids, falsely representing to doctors that patients would only rarely succumb to drug addiction,” the lawsuit reads. “These pharmaceutical companies aggressively advertised to and persuaded doctors to prescribe highly addictive, dangerous opioids and turned patients into drug addicts for their own corporate profit.”

“The residents of New Hanover County are bearing the burden of the cost of the epidemic, as the costs of treatment for addiction, education and law enforcement continue to rise,” Woody White said in a Friday news release. He’s the chairman of the county commissioners. “New Hanover County aims to have this suit accomplish two things: require the responsible parties to pay our taxpayers for the monetary damages caused, and to force them to follow federal law so we can stem the tide of this horrible epidemic, and help save lives.”

Good for them, but this is likely going to be tougher than winning a lawsuit against gun manufacturers, since some of the most respected professionals in our society (doctors) have to approve each prescription. But if the county can get a hefty settlement out of this, it might just jerk a knot in the machine that's destroying so many lives.

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