social media networking

Tuesday Twitter roundup

The last days of the Berger Empire:

It will be interesting to see how they operate without absolute power...

Tuesday Twitter roundup

Not fake news:

Russian spy Mariia Butina is singing like an opera star, and the lyrics are all about the NRA rolling in Russian cash and buying politicians for both of them. And it takes a survivor of the Parkland shooting (David Hogg) to remind us of this fact, which is sad on so many levels I don't know where to begin.

Tuesday Twitter roundup

Not likely to happen in our lifetimes:

Dallas doesn't know the meaning of the word "inappropriate."

Tuesday Twitter roundup

Also on the list of post-Thanksgiving shenanigans:

Thomas Farr is the worst possible choice, especially in a district with such a high level of African-American populations. But there may be some hope:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

No respite for the weary:

I don't even want to speculate what kind of mischief BergerMoore will get up to this time. In the past, they've always floated rumors about some heinous act of repression, and then bait-and-switched it to something (slightly) less horrible. As if playing games with our democracy is a form of recreation, as opposed to an incredibly shameful act.

Tuesday Twitter roundup

Judgment day has arrived:

If you've already voted, take some time to talk to folks at your precinct. If you haven't voted yet, do that first and then talk to people.

Tuesday Twitter roundup

Finally something of which North Carolinians can be proud:

I'm sure BergerMoore is stewing like an apple, but they better leave this one alone.

Tuesday Twitter roundup

The very latest in Republican negligence:

This is Trumpcare by the numbers; people with pre-existing conditions are losers and don't deserve good coverage.

Democratic candidates are winning the social media campaign

Hopefully that will play out in the ballot box as well:

A New York Times analysis of data from the Facebook and Instagram accounts of hundreds of candidates in next month’s midterm elections reveals that Democrats — and especially Democrats running for House seats — enjoy a sizable national lead in engagement on the two influential platforms.

Measuring total interactions on social media is an imperfect way to gauge a candidate’s electoral chances, in part because it does not distinguish between types of engagement. A negative comment left on a Republican candidate’s page by an angry Democrat would still count as an interaction, for example. In addition, it does not account for the fact that some candidates have more followers than others. But social media engagement can be a crude measure of popularity, and a bellwether of shifts in public opinion that often turn up in polls days or weeks later.

I've been keeping an eye on this for several months now and, strangely enough, some of our state-level candidates have been drawing more "likes" than those running for Congress. It's not odd to see over a hundred accumulate within a few hours of a posting. While this appears to be fantastic news for US House races, the Senate situation doesn't appear to be so promising:

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